geology of some ring complexes from the Red Sea Hills (N.E. Sudan). 1976.
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geology of some ring complexes from the Red Sea Hills (N.E. Sudan). 1976.

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Published .
Written in English


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Open LibraryOL13661513M

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The Red Sea Hills physiographic province and the interior plains to the Nile in the west are made up of basement complex rocks in which four major stratigraphic-metamorphic units have been recognized. The Red Sea is part of an extensive rift system that includes from south to north the oceanic Sheba Ridge, the Gulf of Aden, the Afar region, the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aqaba, the Gulf of Suez, and. granitoids. Some complexes in the Red Sea Hills may be post-tectonic calcalkaline granites related to a Pan- African subduction zone (Vail ). The anorogenic alkaline complexes show a distinctive change in the degree of alkalinity and silica-saturation with time: Palaeozoic complexes are .   The Roman narrative for Egypt includes the quarrying of monumental hard stones and the mining of gold, emeralds and amethyst in the Red Sea Hills of the Eastern Desert that separates the Nile from the Red Sea.. To the east of the Nile is the Eastern Desert, also known as the Red Sea Hills because it borders the Red Sea. This is a much more mountainous region than the Western Desert, with some.

Desert (constituting the Red Sea hills), southern part of Sinai and minor exposures at the extreme southwestern corner of the Western Desert of Egypt (Oweinat area), (Fig. ). They extend as a belt parallel to the Red Sea coast for a distance of about km between latitudes 22° 00 / and 28° 40 / N. These rocks are unconformably overlain. The changes in the S Red Sea involved the propagation of the Afar Triple Junction westward to its present location (~°N, 42°E), the transfer of rifting from the S Red Sea (Bab-al-Mandab) to. The Red Sea is part of an extensive rift system that includes from south to north the oceanic Sheba Ridge, the Gulf of Aden, the Afar region, the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aqaba, the Gulf of Suez, and the Cairo basalt province.   the Ring of Fire is mostly a volcanic terrain with mantle derived ultramafic intrusive complexes emplaced at the base of the volcanic pile. It may be comparable to the layered Bushveld Igneous Complex (BIC) in South Africa, albeit on a smaller scale. The BIC is a massive saucer shaped body that underlies an area of roug km2.

BASEMENT COMPLEX OF THE RED SEA HILLS by A. J. Whiteman Introduction Recently Lotfi and Kabesh () published a note "On a New Classification of Basement Rocks of the Red Sea Hills, Sudan." Their main conclusions, that there were three géosynclinal phases, each separated by unconformity and orogeny. This reference volume deals reviews the tectonic elements, the geology of the Pan-African Shield, and Phanerozoic geological evolution of the five North African countries, and describes most of the lithostratigraphic units. Including over literature references, this volume is an essential information source for geologists, geophysicists. The largest of these tectonically dismembered ophiolite complexes occurs near the Red Sea around Gabal Gerf between lat. 22” and 23”N and long. 34”30’ and 35”30’E (Fig. 1). John McPhee takes the reader on an epic voyage across and into North America, as well as the field of geology, the lives and ideas of some of its practitioners, and into deep time. This book is a multi-layered, multi-textured reading experience featuring McPhee's enthusiasm for geology, human history, and the precise and illuminating use of Reviews: